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Tablet questions. Anyone who hangs out in the digital art forum or the hardware forums sees these threads constantly, and they pop up other places to. Which tablet should I get? Is it worth it to get a tablet? What's a good starter tablet? This article will cover the basics of drawing tablets: what they are, what they do, if you need one, and which one you should get.


What is the difference between a drawing tablet and a touchscreen tablet such as an Ipad? Can I draw with both?

To put it simply, a drawing tablet is used solely for art related endeavors, there's no apps or other functions involved. You can't stick a calender and fruit ninja on a drawing tablet. But a touchscreen tablet has tons of different functions and is all touch controlled.

So, can you use a touchscreen tablet for art? Technically, yes. But it can be challenging. Touchscreen tablets aren't as precise and the apps you can get to draw with aren't generally very extensive. This is fine for doing quick sketches on the go, but the more refined you want to make your piece the more challenging it gets. It isn't impossible though, take this piece that was created on an Ipad:

ipad zombie by Peter-Ortiz

If you do decide to use a touchscreen tablet for art it may be useful to invest in a stylus for it, so you can better see and control what you're drawing. You also want to be careful about which tablet you choose. An IPad is going to work better for drawing than a Nook, for example.


Should I get a tablet for digital art?

You don't have to get a tablet, no. People can do amazing things with a mouse. A tablet will give you a lot of functions that a mouse can't though, and these can really help speed up your workflow and make certain effects easier. Here's just a few of the things a tablet can offer that a mouse can't:
  • Pressure sensitivity. This will allow your lines to taper and widen based on how much pressure you are applying with your pen. Now, some art programs allow you to have pen pressure without a tablet (SAI and MangaStudio, to name a couple), but not all programs do this and some programs are much better at it than others. Having a tablet will make using pen pressure easier and more natural looking in many cases.
  • Pressure opacity. This is a great tool for shading because it helps mimic an artists natural use of paint by allowing them to lay down different amounts of paint easily and quickly.
  • Shortcut buttons. Ctrl+Z, Ctrl+P, Ctrl+Shift+Z, all those little shortcuts you stretch your fingers across the keyboard to use can be easily programed into the buttons on your tablet so all you have to do is click that nice little button once and not worry about doing yoga with your hands to get things done.
  • More natural feel. This one is a bit debatable, but most people feel that drawing with a pen works better for them because it feels more like a natural way of drawing. This is especially true for artists who also work heavily in traditional media.


What do all those tablet terms I see when looking for a tablet mean?

:bulletpink: The accuracy of a tablet is how accurately it measures and captures the movements of your pen.

:bulletpink: Pressure Sensitivity is a tablet's ability to sense how much pressure you are applying with your tablet pen to help simulate a more natural drawing experience. Depending on your settings this will allow you to change things such as line thickness or the opacity of the color you are painting with. There are two main levels of pressure sensitivity: 1024 levels and 2048 levels. This does make a difference, specifically at the ends of the pressure spectrum. The more levels of pressure you have the more accurately that pressure will be reflected in your drawing.

:bulletpink: Tilt sensitivity is a tablet's ability to sense the angle at which your pen is being held. Think of it like how you color with the tip of a pencil vs. the side of the pencil depending on how thick you want the line to be. This helps control different functions and create a more natural drawing experience.

:bulletpink: The Active Area of a tablet is the area used for actually drawing. It is the rectangle that correlates to the screen of your computer.

:bulletpink: The wireless capabilities of a tablet involve weather or not the tablet can function wirelessly.

:bulletpink: The compatibility of a tablet involves which systems it will work on such as mac or windows.

:bulletpink: The resolution of a tablet involves how much detail you will be able to get with the tablet and how well it correlates with your screen.

:bulletpink: The programmable keys of a tablet are just that, customizable buttons that you can program to do a variety of functions to help speed up your workflow. Different tablets have different amounts of buttons, anywhere from none up to over twenty.

:bulletpink: The touch capabilities of a tablet involve weather or not a tablet has touchscreen like functions on top of it's capability to be used with a pen.


What tablet should I get?

Bamboo Tablets


The Bamboo line of tablets is a great beginner tablet for those just getting into digital art and who want to test the waters a little before getting something more expensive. They are small, but still powerful enough to do what you need them to if you are a beginner.

Bamboo Connect, Bamboo Splash, Bamboo Capture
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/- .02 in (+/- 0.5 mm)
:bulletpink:Pressure Sensitivity: 1024 levels.
:bulletpink:Tilt Sensitivity: None.
:bulletpink:Active Area: 5.8inches x 3.6inches (14.732cm x 9.144cm)
:bulletpink:Wireless Capabilities: None built in.
:bulletpink:Compatibility: Windows 7, Vista SP2, XP SP3, Mac OS X.10.5 or higher, Intel Processor
:bulletpink:Resolution: 2540 lpi (lines per inch)
:bulletpink:Programmable Keys: None
:bulletpink:Touch Capabilities: None
:bulletpink: Price: $79.00USD-$99.00USD on the Wacom site

It was a little difficult to use at first, but my baby goes through a LOT of abuse and it gives me no problems. I noticed my USB cable is getting a little finicky but I think that's because of my cat's abuse more then mine. I'll just have to get a wireless for it.

It's sensitive enough for most programs to read and it's suitable for those that are heavy or light handed. ... (Read Full Review)


Bamboo Create
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/- .02 in (+/- 0.5 mm)
:bulletpink:Pressure Sensitivity: 1024 levels.
:bulletpink:Tilt Sensitivity: None.
:bulletpink:Active Area: 8.5inches x 4.5inches (14.732cm x 9.144cm)
:bulletpink:Wireless Capabilities: None built in.
:bulletpink:Compatibility: Windows 7, Vista SP2, XP SP3, Mac OS X.10.5 or higher, Intel Processor
:bulletpink:Resolution: 2540 lpi (lines per inch)
:bulletpink:Programmable Keys: None
:bulletpink:Touch Capabilities: None
:bulletpink:Price: $199USD on the Wacom site

I've used Wacom tablets for years, from the low end to the best they offer. When I had the chance to test this "fun" tablet I expected it to be rather basic. But it's actually quite impressive. For one thing, this can be used by both right- and left-handed users. I installed it on my Mac (OS Lion) with ease, and setup was a cinch. I'm used to Wacom's features, though, so I deliberately approached this as if I were a new user, and I was pleased that fine-tuning the functions and specs is quite simple. It's impressive how many ways you can engineer this tablet to work for you: you can designate myriad functions for each button, as well as the sensitivity of the pen tip and eraser.

I ran this in Photoshop CS5 and found that is assimilates perfectly as a drawing tool--new users who are considering this shouldn't be the slightest bit concerned that incorporating a tablet into their Photoshop, Corel, etc. ... (Read Full Review)


Intous 5 Tablets


The Intous line of tablets is the next level up from the bamboo line. They are larger and have more features including higher levels of pressure sensitivity, tilt sensitivity, programmable buttons and more. The line is currently in it's fifth version, which is the one covered here. Earlier versions can still be found on amazon and other sites though.

Intous Touch 5 Small
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/-0.01 inches (0.25 mm)
:bulletpink: Pressure Sensitivity: 2048 levels
:bulletpink: Tilt Sensitivity: +/- 60 degrees
:bulletpink: Active Area: 6.2 x 3.9 inches (157x98 mm)
:bulletpink: Wireless Capabilities: With wacom wireless kit, sold separately.
:bulletpink: Compatibility: Mac and PC
:bulletpink: Resolution: 5080 lpi
:bulletpink: Programmable Keys: 6
:bulletpink: Touch Capabilities: Yes
:bulletpink: Price: $229 USD on the Wacom site

In short, I love the hardware. The capacitive/real buttons are good (though I'm not sold on the circular slider - the circumference is just not big enough for smooth action). The soft touch surface is great, the combination of pen and touch is a win for my use case. I'm a heavy Adobe user, and the pen has always been a great tool for those pieces of software. Where the pen came up short was standard OS interaction and casual web surfing, etc. This is where the multi-touch aspect of the tablet shines. (Read Full Review)


Intous Touch 5 Medium
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/-0.01 inches (0.25 mm)
:bulletpink: Pressure Sensitivity: 2048 levels
:bulletpink: Tilt Sensitivity: +/- 60 degrees
:bulletpink: Active Area: 8.8 x 5.5 inches (224x140 mm)
:bulletpink: Wireless Capabilities: With wacom wireless kit, sold separately.
:bulletpink: Compatibility: Mac and PC
:bulletpink: Resolution: 5080 lpi
:bulletpink: Programmable Keys: 8
:bulletpink: Touch Capabilities: Yes
:bulletpink: Price: $349 USD on the Wacom site

I was unsure whether I should get the Intuos 5 after reading some of the reviews of it, but after purchasing the Intuos 5 (Large), I am quite happy with my purchase. The Intuos 5 is an excellent device. The pen functions are excellent, and they alone are enough to justify the cost. The pen functions work perfectly. The accuracy and pressure sensitivity work with no problems. I can't say much about the angle sensativity since I haven't used anything that takes advantage of it. Although, the results vary a bit from one program to another, I am quite sure that the varying results are the fault of the programs rather than the tablet or its drivers. For example, everything works perfectly in GIMP... (Read Full Review)


Intous Touch 5 Large
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/-0.01 inches (0.25 mm)
:bulletpink: Pressure Sensitivity: 2048 levels
:bulletpink: Tilt Sensitivity: +/- 60 degrees
:bulletpink: Active Area: The pen's active area is 12.8 x 8.0 inches (325x203 mm) and the touch active area is 11.8 x 7.5 inces (299 x 190 mm).
:bulletpink: Wireless Capabilities: With wacom wireless kit, sold separately.
:bulletpink: Compatibility: Mac and PC
:bulletpink: Resolution: 5080 lpi
:bulletpink: Programmable Keys: 8
:bulletpink: Touch Capabilities: Yes
:bulletpink: Price: $469 USD on the Wacom site

First of all, the surface does not seem excessively rough. I can't compare it to past intuos models, but just looking at it and feeling it, I can't say it's much more rough than your average laptop track-pad. That being said, since it is technically possible to wear down the surface to the point where it needs to be sent back to Wacom to be replaced (you can't replace it yourself on this model), I would still recommend getting one of those PORSUS covers for it. I've ordered some and am waiting for them to arrive, but even without one it doesn't seem terribly prone to scratches (after a day's use).

As far as driver issues, I did encounter one small problem. While I was installing the bundled software, running Photoshop and basically just multitasking a lot, I did notice that the touch features went a little crazy then stopped working altogether. (Read Full Review)


Cintiq Tablets


Cintiq tablets are, essentially, tablets that allow you to "draw" directly on the monitor of your screen. This can help with the disconnect some people feel when they try and draw with a regular tablet and are looking at their screen and not their hand. They are, however, very expensive.

Cintiq 24 HD
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/-0.01 inches (0.25 mm)
:bulletpink:Pressure Sensitivity: 2048
:bulletpink:Tilt Sensitivity: +/- 40 degrees
:bulletpink:Active Area: 20.41 x 12.8 inches (518.4 x 324 mm)
:bulletpink:Wireless Capabilities: No
:bulletpink:Compatibility: Windows 7, Windows 8 ready, Mac OS X 10.6+
:bulletpink:Resolution: 5080
:bulletpink:Programmable Keys: 10 keys, 2 touch rings,
:bulletpink:Touch Capabilities: You can get it with or without touch capabilities.
:bulletpink: Price: $2,599 USD

This Cintiq, first of all, is ENORMOUS. It comes very well packed in a huge box; the risk of any damage during shipping is minimal, and there are good picture instructions for removing it from the box safely (it weighs in at close to 70 pounds, so it's recommended you get a friend to help you move it from the box to your desk). Its working area is the same as a 24" widescreen monitor, with a healthy border around the outside for all your programmable express keys, which have been redesigned to be even more functional (I'm relieved at the lack of the touch strips, which I always end up disabling). The industrial design is great; unlike the 12WX, which had cables and adaptor bricks spilling all over the place, all the cabling is already hooked up out of the box and is neatly contained inside the Cintiq's support arms. Only three cables stick out the very back: power, USB and video. It's a nice, clean design that's very easy to hook up. (Read Full Review)


Cintiq 22 HD
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/-0.01 inches (0.25 mm)
:bulletpink:Pressure Sensitivity: 2048
:bulletpink:Tilt Sensitivity: +/- 60 degrees
:bulletpink:Active Area: 19.5 x 11.5 inches (475.2 x 267.3 mm)
:bulletpink:Wireless Capabilities: No
:bulletpink:Compatibility: Compatible with both Mac and PC
:bulletpink:Resolution: 5080
:bulletpink:Programmable Keys: 16 keys, 2 touch strips
:bulletpink:Touch Capabilities: You can get it with or without touch capabilities.
:bulletpink: Price: $1,999 USD

I've had this "monitor" a week -- so far, I like it a lot. I used Intuos4 for several years, which was *wonderful* compared to drawing with a mouse. But still, the Intuos was not intuitive in the long run, and I hated looking up all the time, so much so that I was bored to tears after 5 minutes. The Intuos' "disconnect" was a killer for me. I ached for a Cintiq (I know -- such drama). I finally broke down and bought one. I work on Macintosh working mainly in Photoshop CS5 doing 2D stuff.

I was concerned about possibly scratching the surface with the pen, being I use nibs forever -- I'm still using the original nib. I thought seriously about getting a screen-protector, but in that I have a feather-touch, I needn't worry. (Read Full Review)


Cintiq 13 HD
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/-0.01 inches (0.25 mm)
:bulletpink:Pressure Sensitivity:2048
:bulletpink:Tilt Sensitivity: +/- 60 degrees
:bulletpink:Active Area: 11.75 x 6.75 inches (299 x 171mm)
:bulletpink:Wireless Capabilities: No
:bulletpink:Compatibility: Windows 8, 7 (32/64 bit), Vista SP1, XP SP3; Mac OSX v10.6.8 or later (Intel processor)
:bulletpink:Resolution: 5080lpi
:bulletpink:Programmable Keys: 4 buttons, 1 touch ring
:bulletpink:Touch Capabilities:
:bulletpink: Price: $999 USD on the Wacom Site

What you need to know is that its well made in all areas. It is thin and light weight. The AC adapter, unlike the old 12 inch cintiq is much smaller.
I noticed no lag and the cursor responds very quickly in relation to the pens placement on the screen.

The LCD itself is well lit, though it looks a bit dull compared to other LCD panels (color wise). The high pixel density makes everything look crisp and sharp. It is, for all intensive purposes an Intuos 5 with a LCD panel. (Read full Review)




Vistablet Pen Pad
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/-0.05 inches
:bulletpink:Pressure Sensitivity: 1,024
:bulletpink:Tilt Sensitivity: No
:bulletpink:Active Area: 6 x 4.5 inches
:bulletpink:Wireless Capabilities: No
:bulletpink:Compatibility: Microsoft Windows Vista, Windows XP (SP 2), Windows 7, and Apple OSX (10.3 or later)
:bulletpink:Resolution: 2048 lpi
:bulletpink:Programmable Keys: None
:bulletpink: Touch Capabilities: No
:bulletpink: Price: $40 USD on the VisTablet site

Most tablets out there, the good ones, go for well over $200. VisTablet's vTen pad is cheaper than most, and you get more for your money. Compared to most other offname brands out there, VisTablet does an excellent job with their products, making them durable enough for travel.

It's only 6x4.5, but for screens under 19'', unless you're looking for more precision v.s. screen size, that's all you'll need. I love this tablet, and it works really well for the digital art that I like to do. (Read Full Review)


VisTablet Mini-Tablet
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/-0.05 inches
:bulletpink: Pressure Sensitivity: 1024
:bulletpink: Tilt Sensitivity: None
:bulletpink: Active Area: 3 x 5 inches
:bulletpink: Wireless Capabilities:
:bulletpink: Compatibility: Microsoft Windows Vista, Windows XP (SP 2), Windows 7, and Apple OSX (10.3 or later)
:bulletpink: Resolution: 2048 lpi
:bulletpink: Programmable Keys: 12
:bulletpink: Touch Capabilities: None
:bulletpink: Price: $79.99 USD on the VisTablet Site

I am having a blast with this product, I use it specifically to work on GIF files for website banners and with photo shop. It is small and compact so it fits in the inside back pocket of my Swiss Army back pack perfectly allowing me to carry it around and play with it whilst I am waiting in airports. I am very pleased with it. I would now be willing to consider putting out the money for a larger more robust version to really get down to business. (Read Full Review)


VisTablet Original
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/-0.05 inches
:bulletpink: Pressure Sensitivity: 1024
:bulletpink: Tilt Sensitivity: No
:bulletpink: Active Area: 12 x 10 inches
:bulletpink: Wireless Capabilities:
:bulletpink: Compatibility: Microsoft Windows Vista, Windows XP (SP 2), Windows 7, and Apple OSX (10.3 or later)
:bulletpink: Resolution: 2048 lpi
:bulletpink: Programmable Keys: 29
:bulletpink: Touch Capabilities: None
:bulletpink: Price: $119.99 USD on the VisTablet Site

First, I would like to rebut some things said here, which may have been based on an older version of the driver/hardware, or maybe were just wrong. The most recent version of the driver (3.32) supports both relative as well as absolution positioning. It works on multiple displays, (I have two 1600x1200, displays one in landscape mode) and the driver software lets you select just a portion of your display for absolute positioning, and/or a portion of the tablet as the active region.

That said, the configuration options can be a little buggy, but once set the tablet works as configured.

The tablet's X,Y tracking is smooth, fast and precise, I don't notice a difference between it and the bamboo. I did the same thing another reviewer did, and used a straightedge to check and see if the digitizer was straight. I got nice parallel lines. Maybe, he was using something more precise than me, but I am fairly happy with the X,Y behavior. It works fantastically for handwriting recognition, basic drawing, and as a mouse replacement. (Read Full Review)


The Realm
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/- 0.05 mm
:bulletpink: Pressure Sensitivity: 2048
:bulletpink: Tilt Sensitivity: None
:bulletpink: Active Area: 10 x 6.35 inches
:bulletpink: Wireless Capabilities: None
:bulletpink: Compatibility: Microsoft Windows Vista, Windows XP (SP 2), Windows 7, and Apple OSX (10.3 or later)
:bulletpink: Resolution: 5080 lpi
:bulletpink: Programmable Keys: 8
:bulletpink: Touch Capabilities: None
:bulletpink: Price: $139.99 USD on the VisTablet Site

o Glad I did try this tablet out. It is very decent for the money, responsive and seems to work great so far. Also it is very thin and not bulky at all. I am using it with Manga Studio 5, running on an Apple Macbook Version 10.6.8 with 8 GB of Ram. The pen is pretty decent quality as well. It's not cheap and tingy, much like the first verison of the Tursion I ordered. The only fault here, is that is comes with only two extra tips. But they tell you in the included information how to order more, so I will be doing that. Everything seems to be going smooth so far and the pictures are coming out decent. (Read Full Review)


VisTablet Muse Pro
:bulletpink: Accuracy: +/- 0.01 mm
:bulletpink: Pressure Sensitivity: 2048
:bulletpink: Tilt Sensitivity: +/- 60 degrees
:bulletpink: Active Area: 10 x 6 inches
:bulletpink: Wireless Capabilities:
:bulletpink: Compatibility: Mac OS X 10.4 and above, Windows OS: XP / Vista / Windows7
:bulletpink: Resolution: 5080lpi
:bulletpink: Programmable Keys: 20 buttons, two touch rings
:bulletpink: Touch Capabilities: None
:bulletpink: Price: $259.99 USD on the VisTablet Site

I'm totally against the monopolization of Wacom, so I researched for three days until I discovered the VT Muse. I'm not an expert in tablets, I've only owned a Kanvus Artist 127 tablet before this (a great tablet that was, but unfortunately it was physically damaged and rendered nonfunctional). This is a pretty good tablet, worth its price. The active area is comfortable; the stylus/pen is a JOY to use, especially since it's battery-less and slim to hold; there are more express keys (the buttons on either side of the active area) than I need but I simply deactivated the ones I didn't need; the shortcut buttons at the top and wheel are awesome. (Read Full Review)


Other Brands

There are many other brands of tablets out there, but I don't want this article getting to long. The above should give you an idea of how to look for and compare tablets. Consider it a starting point to compare against. Here's a few other tablet brands you can look over, and be sure to look up customer reviews for any tablet you consider buying on sites such as Amazon.com to be sure you're getting honest feedback.

UC-Logic/Digipro

Aiptek

CalComp

MonoPrice


Final Notes

All the prices given above are in USD and are the prices given on the specifics sites dedicated to those tablets. You can find each of those tablet's for cheaper on sites like Amazon.com where you can buy them both new and used. If you're going to buy a tablet used then be especially sure you are buying from a reliable seller so you don't get jipped. 

All reviews for tablets in this article are taken from Amazon.com. Please feel free to leave your own reviews of any tablet you own, even if it isn't mentioned here, in the comments of this article! In fact, I encourage you to do that so other people can look over reviews from fellow deviants. 





Tablet questions. Anyone who hangs out in the digital art forum or the hardware forums sees these threads constantly, and they pop up other places to. Which tablet should I get? Is it worth it to get a tablet? What's a good starter tablet? This article will cover the basics of drawing tablets: what they are, what they do, if you need one, and which one you should get.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconblue-ba:
Blue-ba Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2014  Student General Artist
I know this is a bit late but I need help picking a tablet >.<

Its hard to explain but I need a tablet where when you lift the pen really high so the cursor doesn't move with it then you press the pen tip on another area the cursor doesnt teleport to where the tip is.

For example the tablet pen is pressed on the bottom left and so is the cursor on the monitor screen but you lift the tablet pen so the cursor does not move at all until you press the pen onto the bottom right then the cursor teleports to the bottom right.

If you know any tablets that don't do this please tell me as soon as you can
Reply
:iconkatara-alchemist:
Katara-Alchemist Featured By Owner Apr 19, 2014  Student General Artist
Don't worry! This article is meant to stay useful (though I do need to update it a bit). :)

Let me clarify, do you want the cursor to teleport with the pen or not? Because you seem to have asked for both. Either way though, this is something that is controlled by the tablet "mapping" under the tablet properties and I would think most tablets could do this for your (either setting), but I know for sure my Intous can as can other Wacom's I believe.

Hope this helps!
Reply
:iconblue-ba:
Blue-ba Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2014  Student General Artist
I'd like the cursor to not teleport with the pen

its good to hear that it can be controlled by mapping thank you this has been great help :)
Reply
:iconkatara-alchemist:
Katara-Alchemist Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2014  Student General Artist
No problem. I'm glad I could help. :)
Reply
:iconmirmzy:
mirmzy Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
This is very helpful! So is the Wacom cintiq 13 hd a tablet that let's you draw directly on the screen rather than looking up at a monitor? I'm looking for something like that, or like the contra you said you got, but I have a more limited budget :p
Reply
:iconkatara-alchemist:
Katara-Alchemist Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2013  Student General Artist
The 13hd does let you draw straight on the screen, yes. :)
Reply
:iconmirmzy:
mirmzy Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Thank you!
Reply
:iconkatara-alchemist:
Katara-Alchemist Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2013  Student General Artist
Welcome.
Reply
:iconhuman-pon3:
Human-pon3 Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
This is awesome! I'm new to tablets (I haven't got one yet, planning on asking for one for Christmas) and this is really helpful. I didn't realize that there are so many different kinds! I think I'm going to go for the VisTablet Original, it seems to have what I'm looking for (Y'know, size, pressure, ect.). Thanks again!
Reply
:iconkatara-alchemist:
Katara-Alchemist Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2013  Student General Artist
No problem, I'm glad I could help!
Reply
Add a Comment: